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IM-Pressing MAC Pigments

*Post originally written by Olivia J on The Unknown Beauty Blog.*


Some of you may have been curious on the details of the pressed MAC pigments in my previous posting.  Since I was busy in my TUBB lab, I decided to take a pictorial record of my tutorial.  This is really for me more than anyone else.

Here are a few extra ingredients you need for a really good dry press: Waxelene and vegetable glycerine.


A few scoops in the sizes of 1/4 teaspoon, 1/8 teaspoon, and a pinch.


Also, these measuring spoons are helpful too!


The Process

Here, I am pressing my MAC Circa Plum pigment.  Take a couple of 1/4 teaspoons.  I take about 4 to 5 which is an ample amount to press into two small eyeshadow pans.  Make a hole in the center.


You need a mug warmer or a candle warmer for this process.  This helps melt the Waxelene and mix the pigments more thoroughly.  In the center place the Waxelene, about a pinch and allow it to melt.


Mix it thoroughly and test the texture.  I usually check to see if it can be pressed into the side of the bowl to see if it will press easily (red circle).  The first shows a slightly loose press so I just add a smidgen of more Waxelene.  Don't add too much or it will turn into just a soft cream instead of a powder/cream shadow.  After mixing the press is just right. 


I just press it into the pan in its dry form.  No need for alcohol.  It turns out something like what you see below.



Here is the result of my MAC Circa Plum.  The swatch on the right is more intense and less drying.  It is also easier to apply onto any skin type without applying it wet.  On mature lids it goes on much smoother thanks to the Waxelene!

Now, let's say you have a matte or a satin type of MAC pigment.  These are dryer and tend to crumble even when dry-pressed.  This is where the vegetable glycerine comes in.

This is the MAC Nebula which is a satin matte type of finish.  I found it a bit dry looking and the color a bit on the sheer side.  I added the usual 4 to 5 scoops and a pinch of Waxelene and also about an 1/8th of a teaspoon of glycerine.  Mixed it together until small balls of pigments appear.  (Think of making scones.)  Again all this is done on top of a mug warmer.


After the mixing, I just press into the pan and the result is below.


Here is the swatch of MAC Nebula.  The one on the left is before I pressed it which is sheer and dry looking.  The one on the right is after I mixed it.  See how intense it becomes?


Here are some other swatches of MAC pigments that I pressed.

MAC Subtle pigment.  Hard to distinguish from the picture but in real life, the left swatch is less intense, dry with major fallout.  Right it stays on without any problems and has a nice moisturizing sheen.


The following are from a MAC Stacked collection which I forgot the name.  Turned out with nice results!




None of the swatches were ever foiled (applied wet) they were just applied dry.

Before, I never had a love for MAC Pigments because I found the container and the process a bit tedious and not to mention messy.  Don't get me wrong, I like loose eyeshadow but something about MAC didn't jive with me.  However, now after pressing them, I enjoy wearing them!


If you want more suggestions and I admit better ones than mine on pressing eyeshadow; check out LisaLise post here.

If you have a post on pressing eyeshadow, just leave your url in the comment below.  (Please, no spam.)



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